Sunday, 7 August 2016

Anton Chekhov's Three Sisters

Three Sisters. Photo: Marnya Rothe
Anton Chekhov's first play, Three Sisters, was written in 1901 for the Moscow Arts Theatre and presents the story of three sisters over the course of several years. There is Olga (Janine Watson), the eldest, a teacher, who appears to be the more sensible of the three. Masha (Paige Gardiner), the middle sister who married at eighteen to a man she has come to dislike and disparage. Lastly there is Irina (Zoe Jensen), who is celebrating her naming day as the play opens and the three sisters reflect on the year before when their father died. The party is soon joined by military men Baron Tuzenbach (Graeme McRae) and Solyony (Dorje Swallow), as well as close family friend Chebutykin(Noel Hodda). 

The family are spoilt and indulged, discussing how they have never worked but how fulfilling they imagine it would be. The sister's studious brother, Andrey (Tom Campbell) is studying to be a professor and is in love with an entirely unsuitable woman, Natasha (Lauren Richardson), whom his sister's view as "common". The Baron professes his love for Irina and a flirtation develops between Masha and the mysterious Vershinin (Justin Stewart-Cotta).

As we enter into the second Act, several years have passed, Andrey and Natasha are unhappily married and he has sacrificed his academic career for the local council, Masha and Vershinin continue their affair, and Irina, now pursued by both the Baron and Solyony, is despondent and longing to return to Moscow where she feels she will find a better suitor. A fire sees Olga roll up her sleeves and serve her community while the other sisters remain self-indulgent and sullen. To be honest, most of the characters are rather unsympathetic and talk nonsense, except Olga who appears to be the only person to consider others feelings instead of her own when she jumps to the defense of the maid Anfisa (Lyn Pierse).

Three Sisters was funnier than I had expected which made for a nice diversion from some of the heavy "philosophising" which was a common occurrence. The entire cast were exceptional, with a genuine family dynamic that was entirely authentic. There was an overwhelming sense of despair at the conclusion of the play, and an acceptance of ones fate which each of the sisters had accepted and resigned themselves to.

As I left the theatre I heard a fellow theatre-goer say "Well, I feel really good about my life right now" - and perhaps this is how best to sum up Three Sisters - an expertly performed display of how things could always be worse. 

More information and to book check out the website.          



Three Sisters. Photo: Marnya Rothe

Three Sisters. Photo: Marnya Rothe
Three Sisters. Photo: Marnya Rothe

Three Sisters. Photo: Marnya Rothe

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Tuesday, 12 April 2016

The Game’s Afoot; or Holmes for the Holidays at the Pavilion Theatre

Image Courtesy of the Pavilion Theatre.

As the curtain opens you would be forgiven for thinking you had stumbled into the wrong theatre. On stage we see Sherlock Holmes concluding a murder investigation and catching his killer – but how can that be when we are only three minutes in?

Read the full review at the AU review.
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Anthony Bartok: New Work

With titles such as Everyone is very excited about the new phone. It is slightly different than the old phone and Sam watches a funny cat video, painter and printmaker Anthony Bartok’s New Work uses humour to expose what he describes as the “slow decline of the modern West.” 

Read the full preview over at Art Guide Australia.
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The Charged Object: soft sculpture and the aesthetics of touch

Everyone has a favourite jumper. It’s snuggly, warm, comforting and familiar. Through soft sculpture installations, The Charged Object takes these feelings out of the domestic space and into the gallery context.

Read the full preview over at Art Guide Australia.
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Thursday, 15 October 2015

La Revolution at City Recital Hall


Just days after the landing of the First Fleet at Botany Bay in 1788 the La Perouse expedition landed in the bay. Had they been a few days earlier perhaps we would all be speaking French. This piece of Australian - French history is relayed to us by Jane Rutter, flautist and Artistic Director of La Revolution, a concert in celebration of Bastille Day.

Read the full article on the AU review.
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Frances Barrett, The Wrestle, 2015. Photo: Zan Wimberley. Courtesy of 4A.

48HR Incident at 4A Centre for Contemporary Chinese Art saw artists from Australia, Asia and the Pacific inhabit the gallery space in varying degrees over the course of three days. With the aim of challenging pre-existing social frameworks of the individual in relation to the group, I admired the overarching set-up and concept of 48HR Incident. Over the course of the three days the gallery remained open late and the fact that audience members could wander in and out at will and see exceptional performance work at all hour of the night gave a sense of freedom and spontaneity not often associated with galleries. I managed to see three works over the course of the exhibition - Latai Taumoepeau’s Dark Continent, Frances Barrett’s The Wrestle and Tony Schwensen’s SCABLAND

Read the full article on the AU review.

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Thursday, 24 September 2015

El’ Circo Blanc at Slide

El' Circo Blanc - Mr Gorski and friend. Courtesy of El' Circo Blanc.

Slide in Sydney specialises in experiences. As soon as you enter the world of El’ Circo Blanc you are transported to a Russian winter wonderland. Alicia Quin as the Russian Babushka effortlessly guides the audience through a narrative that takes us through her life in the Imperial Circus. A talented singer, her vocals accompany the many acts which punctuate the evenings five course degustation menu. 

Read the full article on the AU review.
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